Moore Responds To McConnell: ‘I’m Not Difficult To Manage; It’s Impossible For Him To Manage Me’


“The hopelessness is over.”

Judge Roy Moore responded Tuesday night to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s apparent concern that the conservative firebrand would be “difficult to manage” if he were elected to be Alabama’s next U.S. senator in the upcoming special election.

In a campaign appearance before the Coffee County Republican Club in southern Alabama, the former chief justice was asked about a CNN article saying McConnell does not want to add a “conservative rebel in a GOP conference already difficult to manage.” The comment was certainly a reference to Moore, who is leading in the race, according to the most recent polling.

“Now, I just want to make Mitchell McConnell to know,” the judge said in response, “I’m not difficult to manage. It’s impossible for him to manage me.”

Among the issues Moore differs with McConnell on is the Senate health care plan currently under consideration.

“We need to repeal Obamacare,” Moore said. “We don’t need replacement. This is socialized medicine. It did not work in Europe it won’t work here. Find it in the Constitution where the federal government is responsible for health care. It is not there.”

The West Point graduate and Vietnam War veteran wondered how people can expect the federal government to oversee a national health care system when it struggles to manage the Veterans Affairs hospital system, according to the Dothan Eagle.

Moore further accused establishment Republicans of not honoring their campaign promises by not seeking to fully repeal Obamacare. “They ran on one thing and are doing another,” he said.

McConnell’s pick in the race is Sen. Luther Strange, who was appointed to the open Senate seat in February by disgraced former Gov. Robert Bentley.

Despite being appointed to the position, the National Republican Senatorial Committee, which does McConnell’s bidding, said it will treat Strange as an incumbent and put its full weight behind helping the appointee prevail against Moore and the other GOP candidates in the Aug. 15 primary.

The NRSC’s super PAC plans to spend $2.6 million in air time for Strange and has threatened any campaign vendors who help Moore or any other contender with being cut out from NRSC funding during the 2018 election cycle.

“We have made it very clear from the beginning that Sen. Luther Strange would be treated as an incumbent,” NRCS communications director Katie Martin told Politico. “It has also been a clear policy that we will not use vendors who work against our incumbents.”

Moore’s campaign chair — former state senator and state Republican Party chairman Bill Armistead — is up for the challenge.

“The establishment candidates have the money. We have the people, and our grassroots warriors are looking forward to beating the heck out of Washington and making Judge Roy Moore our voice in the U.S. Senate,” Armistead said.

Moore took on and defeated the Republican establishment candidates in both 2000 and 2012 to become Alabama’s chief justice. He won the primary races with more than 50 percent of the vote in both instances, negating the need for a runoff.

Alabama political observers, including columnists Steve Flowers and Quin Hillyer, see this year’s contest as one that will likely be a two-man race between Moore and Strange, despite a total of seven candidates vying for the nomination, including Congressman Mo Brooks.

Internal polling released by the Brooks’ campaign last month showed Moore in the lead with 31 percent, followed by Strange at 23 percent and Brooks at 21 percent.

Hillyer believes Moore’s chances of winning in the August primary are very good, particularly given that special elections generally have lower voter turnout.

“Someone with an avid following and an established organization like Moore will get his vote out when others won’t,” the Mobile resident said.

If no candidate garners over 50 percent of the vote on August 15, there will be a run off between the top two on Sept. 26, followed by the general election on Dec. 12.

The winner of the Republican primary is highly favored to prevail in December in the deep red state.

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